Primitive Medicine Vol. 2 - Now AVAILABLE!

listen to the album here:

Praise For Primitive Medicine Vol. 2!

"Reuniting with friend Carlos Santana and joined by Blues harmonica virtuoso Charlie Musselwhite, Santana founding member Michael Carabello reaches simultaneously into the past and the future of latin music on his latest offering, Primitive Medicine, Vol 2 – a 21st century exodus into new musical territory firmly rooted in its rich cultural past, with Conquero extraordinaire Carabello leading his band of intrepid explorers as they cut a fresh path across the musical landscape."

-Music journalist and author: Joel Selvin

 

"Now in 2022, Michael brings us Primitive Medicine, Vol 2, including three unique and forceful instrumentals featuring musicians including Carlos Santana and Charlie Musselwhite. Each track brings its ownstory, rhythm, and spirit that when woven together takes the listener on

a compelling journey."

-Gabriel Nansen

 

"I suspect that Primitive Medicine, Vol 2 has a special place in Michael Carabello’s heart if only because this is Carabello doing Carabello. For the best part of his storied half century of recorded music, he has been part of collectives and/or a featured side person playing for the most part music composed by others and with others. There have been exceptions most notably, of course, with his time with Santana in the late 1960s-early 1970s, but occasions where we the public have gotten to experience and appreciate the fulness of Michael’s vision have been relatively limited.

Primitive Medicine, Vol 2 is also the answer to the question of when a musician has had more than fifty years’ experience playing everywhere with some of the most talented and well-known artists of his time, with rock royalty, what is next? Is there a next?

 

Primitive Medicine, Vol 2 might just be the new Carabello, composing, arranging, and leading this new and exciting bunch of musical conspirators all determined to make you feel good and cure whatever ails you, Primitive Medicine.

 

Soul Sauce is both a remembrance of and a salute to the legendary vibraphonist Cal Tjader, one of Michael’s earliest influences. Back in the day when this song was virtually ubiquitous, a young Michael Carabello had the opportunity to see this band numerous times and absorb its energy and spirit all the while understanding the function of conga drums in various musical settings both in the clave tradition and outside out it. Much of this musical assimilation would manifest itself when Michael started with Santana in the late 1960s.

This Soul Sauce is highlighted by his seamless collaboration with fellow percussionist Karl Perazzo whose cowbell, alone, is worth listening to and saluting, and whose timbales playing and vocalizations are so simpatico with Michael’s understated but driving congas. Perazzo, a present Santana stalwart and a veteran member of almost twenty-five years and Carabello, a legendary member of the original Santana have fun with this music and with just playing together.

This song is something of a showcase for the brilliance of Erick Peralta’s no-nonsense, exciting, and jazz influenced piano, giving the song a new and different character while still retaining the old vim and vigor of the original. Carabello’s decision to use piano and not the vibraphone (Tjader) further distinguishes his recording from Tjader’s.

Asked why “Soul Sauce”, I suspect that Michael would tell you that he still loves the song after all these years and what better way to share this love and honor Cal Tjader than this.

 

Thoughts with its bold acoustic bass (Roger Kimball) intro and resolute underpinning reunites Carabello with old friend and fellow Santana original, Carlos Santana. With its blues form and jazz elements there is a feeling of mystery and intrigue about this song. Carlos’ signature sound and daring improvisation make it so clear that he’s challenged by this music and enjoys playing this Carabello/Kimball original composition. It’s not so much a case of Michael and Carlos turning the clock back as it is of the two moving forward in this, yet another example of what happens when these friends and musical seekers get together.

 

Carabello enlisted the contribution of another longtime friend, world-renown blues harpist Charlie Musselwhite, and told him to step outside the box and go for it in his arresting composition Reggae Bluz. Charlie succeeded royally and with distinction. Reggae Bluz is party music, get down music, and an invitation to us all to dance and to join the fun and make our own madness. Reggae Bluz has a near-avalanche effect, getting stronger and more infectious as it goes, thanks in large part to the stellar guitar and dobro playing of Paul Pesco and the solid contributions of Carabello on bass, and Hammond B3 organ in addition, of course, to all percussion. By the time the Rachel Wilcox handclaps enter, the music is already on fire.

 

Percussionist, composer, and band leader Michael Carabello takes no solos and plays a clearly supportive role in this recording. And yet, he is a star-he is the star-of the proceedings because it is his vision and imagination, his daring, and leadership that inform every aspect of this recording and it is his joy which permeates everything. This is Carabello doing Carabello. One can only wonder and hope that Primitive Medicine, Vol 2 is but the first of many more to follow. Today we live in a world suffused and tormented by pandemics, war, intolerance, and the collective sins of a past that live on in all their current guises. One can only hope that some kind of global understanding and, perhaps, a good dose of Primitive Medicine, Vol 2 will help to bring about the change for good we so desperately need."

-Hal Miller

"Reuniting with friend Carlos Santana and joined by Blues harmonica virtuoso Charlie Musselwhite, Santana founding member Michael Carabello reaches simultaneously into the past and the future of latin music on his latest offering, Primitive Medicine, Vol 2 – a 21st century exodus into new musical territory firmly rooted in its rich cultural past, with Conquero extraordinaire Carabello leading his band of intrepid explorers as they cut a fresh path across the musical landscape."

-Music journalist and author: Joel Selvin

 

"Now in 2022, Michael brings us Primitive Medicine, Vol 2, including three unique and forceful instrumentals featuring musicians including Carlos Santana and Charlie Musselwhite. Each track brings its ownstory, rhythm, and spirit that when woven together takes the listener on

a compelling journey."

-Gabriel Nansen

 

"I suspect that Primitive Medicine, Vol 2 has a special place in Michael Carabello’s heart if only because this is Carabello doing Carabello. For the best part of his storied half century of recorded music, he has been part of collectives and/or a featured side person playing for the most part music composed by others and with others. There have been exceptions most notably, of course, with his time with Santana in the late 1960s-early 1970s, but occasions where we the public have gotten to experience and appreciate the fulness of Michael’s vision have been relatively limited.

Primitive Medicine, Vol 2 is also the answer to the question of when a musician has had more than fifty years’ experience playing everywhere with some of the most talented and well-known artists of his time, with rock royalty, what is next? Is there a next?

 

Primitive Medicine, Vol 2 might just be the new Carabello, composing, arranging, and leading this new and exciting bunch of musical conspirators all determined to make you feel good and cure whatever ails you, Primitive Medicine.

 

Soul Sauce is both a remembrance of and a salute to the legendary vibraphonist Cal Tjader, one of Michael’s earliest influences. Back in the day when this song was virtually ubiquitous, a young Michael Carabello had the opportunity to see this band numerous times and absorb its energy and spirit all the while understanding the function of conga drums in various musical settings both in the clave tradition and outside out it. Much of this musical assimilation would manifest itself when Michael started with Santana in the late 1960s.

This Soul Sauce is highlighted by his seamless collaboration with fellow percussionist Karl Perazzo whose cowbell, alone, is worth listening to and saluting, and whose timbales playing and vocalizations are so simpatico with Michael’s understated but driving congas. Perazzo, a present Santana stalwart and a veteran member of almost twenty-five years and Carabello, a legendary member of the original Santana have fun with this music and with just playing together.

This song is something of a showcase for the brilliance of Erick Peralta’s no-nonsense, exciting, and jazz influenced piano, giving the song a new and different character while still retaining the old vim and vigor of the original. Carabello’s decision to use piano and not the vibraphone (Tjader) further distinguishes his recording from Tjader’s.

Asked why “Soul Sauce”, I suspect that Michael would tell you that he still loves the song after all these years and what better way to share this love and honor Cal Tjader than this.

 

Thoughts with its bold acoustic bass (Roger Kimball) intro and resolute underpinning reunites Carabello with old friend and fellow Santana original, Carlos Santana. With its blues form and jazz elements there is a feeling of mystery and intrigue about this song. Carlos’ signature sound and daring improvisation make it so clear that he’s challenged by this music and enjoys playing this Carabello/Kimball original composition. It’s not so much a case of Michael and Carlos turning the clock back as it is of the two moving forward in this, yet another example of what happens when these friends and musical seekers get together.

 

Carabello enlisted the contribution of another longtime friend, world-renown blues harpist Charlie Musselwhite, and told him to step outside the box and go for it in his arresting composition Reggae Bluz. Charlie succeeded royally and with distinction. Reggae Bluz is party music, get down music, and an invitation to us all to dance and to join the fun and make our own madness. Reggae Bluz has a near-avalanche effect, getting stronger and more infectious as it goes, thanks in large part to the stellar guitar and dobro playing of Paul Pesco and the solid contributions of Carabello on bass, and Hammond B3 organ in addition, of course, to all percussion. By the time the Rachel Wilcox handclaps enter, the music is already on fire.

 

Percussionist, composer, and band leader Michael Carabello takes no solos and plays a clearly supportive role in this recording. And yet, he is a star-he is the star-of the proceedings because it is his vision and imagination, his daring, and leadership that inform every aspect of this recording and it is his joy which permeates everything. This is Carabello doing Carabello. One can only wonder and hope that Primitive Medicine, Vol 2 is but the first of many more to follow. Today we live in a world suffused and tormented by pandemics, war, intolerance, and the collective sins of a past that live on in all their current guises. One can only hope that some kind of global understanding and, perhaps, a good dose of Primitive Medicine, Vol 2 will help to bring about the change for good we so desperately need."

-Hal Miller